• Edinburgh Art Festival

    by Olivia Palazzo Callum Innes, The Regent Bridge, 2012. Photograph by Stuart Armitt. Courtesy of Edinburgh Art Festival

    The month of August sees thousands of tourists descend upon Scotland’s capital city for the infamous Edinburgh Fringe Festival. With the city’s population almost doubling at this time, surveys show that the majority of the half a million visitors flock to Edinburgh for the notorious comedy scene. However, running parallel to the 3,000-odd shows that fall under the Edinburgh Fringe is Edinburgh Art Festival, the UK’s largest annual festival of visual art. The festival brings together the capital’s museums, galleries and artist-run spaces to create an extensive events programme which celebrates UK and international artists across all ages. 

    Read more
  • It’s written in the Stars…

    by Freya Simms Daniel Crouch Rare Books, Apianus, Petrus Astronomicum Caesareum. Ingolstadt, Peter Apian, 1540.

    Some of the earliest evidence of man on earth demonstrates our perpetual quest to understand exactly where we are at a given time and place. Mapmaking has been an integral part of the human history for thousands of years from cave paintings to ancient maps of Babylon, Greece, and Asia, through the Age of Exploration, and on into the 21st century. People have created and used maps as essential tools to help them define, explain, and navigate their way through the world.  The earliest known maps are of the heavens, not the earth. Dots dating to 16,500 BC found on the walls of the Lascaux caves map out part of the night sky, including the three bright stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair as well as the Pleiades star cluster.

    Read more
  • Whither the Old Master Market

    by Diana Cawdell Galerie Eric Coatelem at TEFAF 2015. Photo: Harry Heuts

    The recent round of Old Master sales in London has been covered widely and inevitably the rather lacklustre results raise questions about the health and future of the Old Master market. It’s a market in decline.  It’s a market that’s dying.  It’s a market that’s dead.  So claim the naysayers.

    Read more
  • London Art Week 2015

    by Georgina Inglis The Weiss Gallery, Cornelius Johnson, An Unknown Lady, Painted 1624, Oil on panel, 77.5 x 61 cm

    We are coming to the end of London Art Week (3-10 July 2015), and Mayfair and St James’s has been awash with collectors, curators and art enthusiasts gallery-hopping from one dealer to another in an area historically famed for its arts community.

    Read more
  • IT’S GOOD TO TALK.

    by Annie McGrath Crowd Talks

    In my foundation year at Camberwell College, I remember asking my tutor if I could go to the library and, without a hint of irony, he said: “you can, but don’t get suffocated by all the knowledge”. I laughed, before realising that he definitely wasn’t joking. 

    Read more
  • Art Fairs: The Auction House alternative for dealers

    Originally published in the May 2015 issue of Arts Industry
    by Tony Thorncroft, Guest blog  Ben Janssens, Bronze ritual food vessel Gui

    One of the familiar London experiences of a generation or so ago was to stroll down Bond Street or Cork Street, glancing in at the ubiquitous art galleries crowding there, to observe a bored young Sloane painting her nails and waiting desperately for a potential customer. It is an image of the past. Now many of those galleries will have transmogrified into global fashion shops and, in those that linger on, the listless girl will have been replaced by a harassed man anxiously searching a computer for an internet sale. Today the passing trade has all but disappeared for art and antique dealers: business is done mainly online – or at art fairs. 

    Read more
  • Dorotheum’s Contemporary Art sale

    by Anna Kirrage Dorotheum, Enrico Castellani (born Castelmassa, Rovigo in 1930) ‘Superficie’, 1960, titled, signed and dated Castellani 1960 on the stretcher, canvas in relief, 100 x 120 cm Schätzwert/Estimate

    Dorotheum’s Contemporary Art sale, held in Vienna on the evening of 10th June, offered for sale the auction house’s most international roster of artists yet. Alongside works by Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, Victor Vasarely and Marc Quinn, was a group of masterpieces by the famed Italian avant-garde school which included artists like Fontana, Manzoni, Bonalumi, Castellani, Scheggi and Melotti.

    Read more
  • All the Fun of the Fairs

    by Hermione Wace Photo: Masterpiece London 2015

    June has arrived, and with it London will see an influx of international collectors, art professionals and aficionados flocking to this month’s veritable feast of art fairs, auctions and exhibitions. The first of the art fairs is Art Antiques London (12-18 June) returning for its fifth edition in Kensington Gardens. It is followed by Olympia International Art & Antiques that will move its dates to 19-28 June, in order to coincide with major Impressionist and Modern art auctions as well as Masterpiece London. The latter will open its door on 25 June, and after only four years is firmly established on the global art calendar. For those on the preview circuit, the excitement continues throughout London Art Week (3-10 July) in which 44 galleries and 3 auction houses will participate.

    Read more
  • A-Mazed: Photo London 2015

    by Abi Gold Teddy BamBam ©Jocelyn Bain Hogg courtesy ATLAS Gallery

    Last weekend, the largest photography fair ever staged in London took place at Somerset House.The weekend event welcomed over 20,000 visitors to 70 international galleries exhibiting vintage and rare prints, and contemporary and new work by both established and emerging talent. Also included were 3 special exhibitions, installations in the courtyard, and a varied talks programme.

    Read more
  • Sculpture shines at RHS Chelsea Flower Show

    by Charly Hancock Sculpture by the Lakes's stand at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show

    Amongst the roses and dahlias, at this year's RHS Chelsea Flower Show, there was an overwhelming presence of outdoor sculpture. One key trend was the use of recycled materials from Laura Antebi's galvanised steel wire sculptures and James Doran Webb's driftwood horses, to the weird and wonderful shell-encrusted animals by Polly Fields, which included a frightfully elaborate Tyrannosaurus Rex head.

    Read more
  • Golden² Consulting

    by Hermione Wace Photo: Rory Lindsay

    Golden Square is fast-becoming a hot spot for the London art scene. Since 2007 it has housed the Frith Street Gallery, with its exhibition programme of leading contemporary artists and emerging talent. But is was the opening of the palatial Marian Goodman Gallery in October 2014, with an inaugural exhibition of Gerhard Richter that really put this corner of Soho on the map. This is not to mention Sadie Coles’ nearby premises on Kingly Street, Pace Gallery on Lexington Street and pop-up gallery Herald St on the Square itself. The newest addition to this impressive line-up is not a gallery, but multi-faceted arts business Golden² Consulting. 

    Read more